Smashing Into Cancer Anger

Despite the ominous nature of the picture above, my mood is really good today. My family and I just returned from a lovely, wonderfully relaxing vacation on Saturday. The picture refers to my guest blog post, Smashing Into Cancer Anger, which was recently published on No Boobs About It, Navigating Breast Cancer During Treatment and as a Survivor.

When I say “smashing,” I’m not kidding! Once you read my post, why don’t you let me know in the comments below if you’ve ever had such a moment of anger. I can’t be the only one (I hope!!)

Survival > Existence,

Debbie

Debbie's picture

Thanks So Much for Your Support

Annette:

Thank you for letting me know that I’m not the only one who experienced anger post-treatment. I remember the shocking explosion and not even knowing where it came from. It’s sad that so many of us aren’t prepared for that post-cancer deluge of emotion, fear and loneliness. We definitely need to keep talking, sharing and getting a lot of support.

Survival > Existence,

Debbie

 

Comments

Annette's picture

You are not alone

Dear Debbie,
Thank you for speaking about emotions that don’t often get spoken of – especially after cancer. I had a time post-cancer when anger was bubbling up, seemingly out of nowhere, and overtaking me. It felt scary and overwhelming and like it might never end.
I believe after we get through the worst of the “flight-or-fight” stages of cancer diagnosis and treatment and the dust just begins to settle a little, emotions we didn’t even fully realize we had can come to the surface.
In the very moment when others think we are “done cancer” and we feel we should be grateful to have survived and want to be getting on with our lives as best as we can, this demon anger can rear its ugly head.
I can relate to the loneliness and the experiences you speak of and am glad you found the support needed to move through this and come out on the other side with relative peace surrounding your life post-cancer.
Thanks for being open and honest and sharing. It feels good to know we’re not alone.

 

Renn's picture

Embacing our anger

Debbie,

Thanks for talking about a topic that needs talking about!

I am not one to anger easily. So it took me by MAJOR surprise me when, the very moment I was wheeled into my room after my double mastectomy, I began yelling at my husband and the guy who was steering my gurney. I couldn’t control myself. It was a bubbling up and an overflowing of so much repressed emotion… emotions I wasn’t even aware I was feeling or repressing! Since then, let feelings my out as they happen. And if I can’t let them out in the moment, I find letting them out before I go to sleep is helpful.

Debbie's picture

Our Anger Needs to be Heard

Renn:

I was shocked too by my anger, which I now find amazing. Why shouldn’t we be angry?? Our entire lives had been turned upside down, we’re afraid, lonely, guilt ridden, etc. etc. That’s a lot to “accept.” I now know that my anger was that part of me that didn’t want to accept, that wanted to run rather than submit, but couldn’t. That part of me was just as valid as any other part and had to be heard. It’s great that you now actively let your feelings out. Do you journal before sleep?

Survival > Existence,

Debbie

 

 

Renn's picture

Debbie, I journal

Debbie, I journal sporadically… only when I have to get something off my chest (pardon the pun). If I’m feeling blue or emotional or sad, I lay in the dark before I fall asleep, let myself feel the emotions, and let the tears fall!

 

Debbie's picture

Crying is My Favorite Form of Catharsis

Renn:

I’m a huge believer in the healing power of crying. There have been so many times when I’ve cryed my eyes out, only to be left wondering why I was so upset. We need the catharsis and good for you for taking care of yourself by making it a priority.

Survival > Existence,

Debbie

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